Activity Works

The farmer could use some help!

Please select an episode:

Let's help the farmer tend his crops!

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Food on the Farm

Congratulations!

Food on the Farm

Completed!

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fun facts fun facts
Berry true
Berry true

A strawberry isn't an actual berry, but a banana is.

Eggs, eggs, eggs
Eggs, eggs, eggs

There are approximately 280 million laying hens producing 50 billion eggs in the U.S. each year.

Holy cow, she’s hungry!
Holy cow, she’s hungry!

A dairy cow that is milking consumes around 100 pounds of feed each day.

Find more fun episode activities below!

lesson plan lesson plan

Overview

Science

Students will visit the farm and gather the foods needed to create a well balanced diet. Creative movements will enable students to select foods from the five food groups and reap the health benefits they provide.

Lesson

My Plate

National Standard(s) Addressed:

#6 Personal and Social Perspectives

Personal Health & Resources.

Goals

Performance

Students will gather different foods on the farm from the five major food groups. 

Cognitive

Students will identify the five food groups and generate examples of appropriate foods for each one. 

Affective

Students will be motivated to eat a well balanced diet. 

Pre-Teach Vocabulary

  • Food Groups – A collection of foods that share similar nutritional characteristics. There are five major food groups: Breads & Grains, Fruits, Vegetables, Proteins, and Dairy.
  • Serving – The quantity or amount of a food that should be eaten.
  • Vitamin – A natural substance that is usually found in foods and helps your body to be healthy.
  • Immune System – The system that protects your body from diseases and infections.

Activate Prior Knowledge

Ask students to list the foods that they ate yesterday, today, or are planning on eating in the near future. Write these foods on the board and organize them into the five food groups. Present a visual of the “My Plate” diagram and have the class determine examples for each of the five food groups. Discuss how much we should eat from each food group in a given day. Lastly, lead a brief discussion about where our food comes and talk a little about farm life. 

Assess and Think Critically

Ask students to generate the five major food groups and to give examples of foods from each one. Ask students to reflect upon their eating habits and determine from which food groups they should eat more or less.

Overview

Physical Education

Students will visit the farm and gather the foods needed to create a well balanced diet. Creative movements will enable students to select foods from the five food groups and reap the health benefits they provide.

Lesson

Eating for Activities

National Standard(s) Addressed:

#3 Physical Activity

Exhibits a physically active lifestyle.

Goals

Performance

Students will identify the foods that best support specific athletic activities. 

Cognitive

Students will differentiate between carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. 

Affective

Students will appreciate the importance of fueling the body appropriately for specific activities. 

Pre-Teach Vocabulary

  • Carbohydrates – A nutrient that our body uses for energy that comes from sugars and starches. Examples include cereals, rice, pasta, and breads.
  • Proteins – A nutrient in foods that the body uses to build, maintain, and replace tissues (the stuff your body is made of). Beef, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts and black beans are examples.
  • Digestion – The process by which food is changed to a simpler form after it is eaten. This allows our food to be used by the body.
  • Hydration – The act of drinking water to allow the body to work properly.

Activate Prior Knowledge

After discussing the new vocabulary for this lesson, have students generate examples of healthy carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Emphasize the importance of selecting lean meats and small portions of healthy fats (peanut butter, olive oil, avocado, etc.) Engage students in a discussion about what foods athletes need to consume to perform at their best. Many athletes consume a great amount of carbohydrates during the days leading up to a major athletic event, such as a marathon. For sports that emphasize building large muscle mass, eating greater amounts of proteins are typically best. Regardless of the sport, hydration is also very important. Athletes who are not properly hydrated may experience headaches, muscle cramps, or fatigue. Hydration is important not only during the athletic event, but in the days leading up to it. 

Assess and Think Critically

Talk about the foods students collected on the farm in today’s Activity Works adventure. Assist students in classifying these foods as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Present students with examples of various athletic events and ask them to identify the types of foods he/she should have consumed leading up to the pictured athletic event.