Activity Works

Get moving with nouns and verbs!

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Moving Parts of Speech

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Most common verbs
Most common verbs

The most commonly used verbs are "be", "have" and "do".

How about that?
How about that?

The word "verb" is a noun.

Most common nouns
Most common nouns

Common nouns refer to common, everyday things.

Find more fun episode activities below!

lesson plan lesson plan

Overview

Parts of speech come to life as students go on an Activity Works adventure to “Nound City” and “Verb Town”! By associating different movements with different parts of speech, it will be easy to identify and use parts of speech correctly.

Lesson:

Nouns and Verbs

National Standard(s) Addressed:

#6 Applyng Knowledge – Students apply knowledge of language structure, e.g., nounds, verbs, etc.

Goals

Performance

Students will identify nouns and verbs in a sentence.

Cognitive

Students will understand how nouns and verbs are used in a sentence to express a message.

Affective

Students will appreciate the need for a complete thought to have both a noun and a verb.

Pre-Teach Vocabulary

Noun: A name of a person, animal, place, thing, or idea. Nouns are divided into two categories: proper nouns and common nouns.

Proper Noun: A specific noun, such as the name of city, the name of a holiday, or the name of a person. Normally proper nouns are capitalized and can not be preceded by words such as “a”, “the”, “any”, or “some”.

Common Noun: A non specific noun that does not need to be capitalized. Common nouns can be preceded by words such as “a”, “the”, “any”, or “some”. Any person, place, thing, animal, or idea that is not specific is a common noun.

Verb: A word that indicates an action, state, or a relation is a verb. The verb in the sentence is the word or words that explain what is happening.

Verb Tense: The time frame of which the verb is used. Past, present, and future are different verb tenses.

Sentence: A complete thought. A sentence must have at least one noun and one verb to be a complete thought.

Subject of a Sentence: The person, place, thing, or idea that is doing or being something. The subject of a sentence is always a noun.

Activate Prior Knowledge:

Display some pictures (either print outs from the internet, clip art, magazine pictures) on the board and ask students to help you categorize the pictures into the following categories: people, things, places animals, ideas, and actions. Some pictures may have people or animals in action so please make sure that students identify both the noun and the verb. Further probe student knowledge, by highlighting various “things” in the classroom. Ask students to identify an action that may go along with the “thing” (ex. window/open).

Assess and Think Critically:

Read students some sentences from one of their favorite classroom stories. Ask students to identify common nouns, proper nouns, and verbs in the story and if they think nouns and verbs are important to the story and why.

Overview

Parts of speech come to life as students go on an Activity Works adventure to “Nound City” and “Verb Town”! By associating different movements with different parts of speech, it will be easy to identify and use parts of speech correctly.

Lesson:

Warm-ups and Cool-downs

National Standard(s) Addressed:

#3 Physical Activity – Exhibits a physically active lifestyle. #4 Physical Fitness – Achieves and maintains a healthy – enhancing level of physical fitness.

Goals

Performance

Students will perform a warm up and cool down at the beginning and end of the Activity Works Adventure.

Cognitive

Students will understand the purpose of a warm-up and a cool-down.

Affective

Students will value the benefits of warm-ups and cool-downs when they exercise.

Pre-Teach Vocabulary

Warm-up: An activity that prepares your body for exercise. Warm-ups are important because your body needs to make adjustments in order to safely exercise. Some of these adjustments include an increase of breathing and heart rates, an increase in energy reactions in the muscles, and an increase in blood flow to the muscles to supply them with oxygen and remove waste.

Cool-down: Slowing down the level of activity after exercising. A cool-down needs to occur gradually. A cool-down helps breathing and heart rates slowly return to normal, prevents dizziness, helps remove waste products from muscles (lactic acid), and prepares your body for your next work out.

Heart Rate: The number of times the heart beats per minute (BPM).

Lactic Acid: Lactic acid is a liquid produced in the muscles after anaerobic activity. Large amounts of this acid are what make our muscles feel “sore” following a strenuous work out.

Activate Prior Knowledge

Before completing the Activity Works segment, ask students what it is important to do prior to exercising. Some answers should include hydration, wearing appropriate clothes/shoes, making sure you have enough room (personal space) for the activity, and a warm-up. Just like cars work best after they are warmed up, so do our bodies! Talk about the specific benefits of a warm up (i.e. your breathing and heart rates gradually increase, energy reactions in the muscles increase, blood flow increases to the muscles, nerve and muscle connections prepare for exercise, etc.). Ask students to give you some examples of warm-up activities.

Assess and Think Critically

Following completion of today’s Activity Works adventure, discuss what students did for the warm-up portion of the segment. Ask students if they felt their bodies gradually preparing for exercise and beginning to perspire. Discuss the end of the segment, and ask students what they did at the end to slowly help return their bodies to normal. Talk about how a cool down needs to be gradual and should include some stretching, as it is best to stretch your muscles when they are already warm from activity.