Activity Works

Journey to India to meet this strange duo!

Please select an episode:

Let the journey begin!

sammy hero

Congratulations!

The Cat and the Parrot

Completed!

sammy hero
fun facts fun facts
Pollies want a cracker?
Pollies want a cracker?

Did you know there are over
350 species of parrots!?

Keepin’ it clean
Keepin’ it clean

Cats have sandpaper-like tongues that they use to groom themselves.

Eye of the tiger
Eye of the tiger

The national symbol of India is the endangered Bengal Tiger.

Find more fun episode activities below!

lesson plan lesson plan

Oh no! The Cat eats everyone in his path and
his horrific behavior leads to his ultimate
destruction. Take your students to India
to hear this delightful story. Intertwined
with dance, cultural beats, and percussion
instruments, students will also learn valuable
moral lessons about how to treat others.

The Moral of the Story
National Standard(s) Addressed:
Literacy
• Retell stories, including key details and
demonstrate understanding of their
central message or lesson

Goals

Performance
Students will participate in 10-15 minutes of dance
activity to improve physical fitness.

Cognitive
Students will understand the art form behind
dance/creative movement and how dance
movements can represent ideas, feelings, or even
people.

Affective
Students will value both the metaphorical nature
of dance and the benefits dance contributes to
physical fitness.
Pre-Teach Vocabulary
Symbolism: The practice or act of using an object,
word, art piece, picture, or even dance movement
to represent something. For example a picture of a
heart could represent the idea of love.
Characters: The people, animals, or figures in a
story.
Activate Prior Knowledge:
Engage students in a conversation about the various
movements/dances they completed in today’s
Activity Works Adventure. Be sure that students see
the relationship between the movements and the
characters they represented. For example students
created the elephant’s trunk with their arms when
the elephants were mentioned in the story. Use the
vocabulary words “symbolize” and “represent” in
this discussion and point out how the movements

represented the different characters of the
story. Once this correlation is clear to students,
tell students that they will be creating a
movement today to represent something
about themselves. Give students examples of
short, beat movements that they could use (if
you love baseball, you could pretend to swing
a bat, someone who is a cheerleader could do a
cheerleading movement, a student who loves
to draw could pretend to be drawing, etc.). Give
students about a minute to create a movement
that represents something (a trait, activity, etc.)
about themselves. Once students have created
movements, circle up as a class and have
students step touch from side to side. While
still step-touching, go around the circle and
have students go to the center of the circle, and
present their movements. Their peers should
try their best to mimic them. Turn on some
music to make this activity a memorable one!

Assess and Think Critically:
After students have completed the “circle up
movement activity”, have them recall and
demonstrate some of their peers’ movements.
Engage students in a discussion of why these
movements are good representations of their
classmates. Talk about how dance is an art form
and the movements a dancer uses are often
meant to tell a story, evoke an idea, or represent
a particular emotion.

Overview:
Oh no! The Cat eats everyone in his path and
his horrific behavior leads to his ultimate
destruction. Take your students to India
to hear this delightful story. Intertwined
with dance, cultural beats, and percussion
instruments, students will also learn valuable
moral lessons about how to treat others.

Lesson:

The Symbolism of Dance

National Standard(s) Addressed:

• The value of physical activity for health,
enjoyment, challenge, self-expression and/
or social interaction.

Goals

Performance
Students will participate in 10-15 minutes of dance
activity to improve physical fitness.

Cognitive
Students will understand the art form behind
dance/creative movement and how dance
movements can represent ideas, feelings, or even
people.

Affective
Students will value both the metaphorical nature
of dance and the benefits dance contributes to
physical fitness.

Pre-Teach Vocabulary
Symbolism: The practice or act of using an object,
word, art piece, picture, or even dance movement
to represent something. For example a picture of a
heart could represent the idea of love.

Characters: The people, animals, or figures in a
story.

Activate Prior Knowledge:
Engage students in a conversation about the various
movements/dances they completed in today’s
Activity Works Adventure. Be sure that students see
the relationship between the movements and the
characters they represented. For example students
created the elephant’s trunk with their arms when
the elephants were mentioned in the story. Use the
vocabulary words “symbolize” and “represent” in
this discussion and point out how the movements represented the different characters of the story. Once this correlation is clear to students,
tell students that they will be creating a
movement today to represent something
about themselves. Give students examples of
short, beat movements that they could use (if
you love baseball, you could pretend to swing
a bat, someone who is a cheerleader could do a
cheerleading movement, a student who loves
to draw could pretend to be drawing, etc.). Give
students about a minute to create a movement
that represents something (a trait, activity, etc.)
about themselves. Once students have created
movements, circle up as a class and have
students step touch from side to side. While
still step-touching, go around the circle and
have students go to the center of the circle, and
present their movements. Their peers should
try their best to mimic them. Turn on some
music to make this activity a memorable one!

Assess and Think Critically:
After students have completed the “circle up
movement activity”, have them recall and
demonstrate some of their peers’ movements.
Engage students in a discussion of why these
movements are good representations of their
classmates. Talk about how dance is an art form
and the movements a dancer uses are often
meant to tell a story, evoke an idea, or represent
a particular emotion.